Tag Archives: Chelsea FC

FA Cup Final Ticket Pricing

Chelsea Supporters will be looking forward to the FA Cup Final on May 19th; a competition in which we have been very privileged to be at the conclusion of many times over the last 20 years.

However, while the team may have fought long and hard to get there, the supporters have had to dip their hands in their pockets repeatedly during an arduous season, arguably an even greater commitment.

Coupled with season ticket renewals in the middle of May to the tune of (on average) £800, the prospect of paying up to £145 for a FA Cup Final ticket is the straw that breaks the camel’s back.

While we certainly do not hope that this is Chelsea’s last visit to a FA Cup Final for the foreseeable future, this must be the last time the FA gets away with such extortionate ticket prices.

In April, the FA met with Supporters’ Trusts from all four semi-finalists and agreed a number of concessions for the Final including reductions in prices for concessionary tickets; a commitment to review the pricing of tickets behind the goals and introducing an accessibly priced family area going forward and keeping future ticket prices in line with inflation.

However, we believe that this is too little, too late and does not go far enough.

The FA Cup Final remains a very special occasion for football supporters, as a chance to see their team triumph in the most historic club competition in football. While demand always exceeds supply; no supporter able to go should be priced out of the Final.

The FA’s specious argument that the pricing reflects the fact that it is one of the most prestigious events in the sporting calendar and that every penny of profit is reinvested in to the grass roots of the game is subterfuge for blatantly profiteering from the very people whose interests they should serve: the loyal supporters who support the game week in, week out.

The Chelsea Supporters’ Trust, together with the other Supporters’ Trusts, vows to keep the pressure on the FA by any means possible, until the FA agree to change their pricing policy and make ticket prices affordable to the long suffering and ordinary supporter.

We have been taken advantage of for long enough and it’s time for this to stop.

David Chidgey, Chairman, Chelsea Supporters’ Trust

Chelsea FC invites fans to a Club organised trip to Auschwitz

Chelsea Supporters Trust logo

As part of the Club’s ongoing ‘Say No to Antisemitism’ campaign, Chelsea FC are inviting fans groups to join the Club’s trip to Auschwitz on 5 June.

The trip is free of charge and open to all members of the Chelsea Supporters Trust. However, please note that due to the layout of the site there is limited accessibility at the Auschwitz Museum.

The Club would particularly welcome applications from fans aged 18-30 and all attendees would need their own valid travel insurance. The Club will also be extending the invitation to members of Chelsea staff.

Timings are to be confirmed however the trip will depart from Gatwick early on the morning of the 5th returning to Gatwick from Poland the same evening. The Club can arrange transport from Stamford Bridge upon request.

The trip is an important part of the Club’s work tackling Antisemitism. Space, however, is limited and in the event of oversubscription the Club will allocate spaces accordingly. The deadline for applications is Tuesday 15th May.

Should you be interested in participating in this trip please contact Simon Taylor at Chelsea (simon.taylor@chelseafc.com) and copy in membership@chelseasupporterstrust.com to confirm you CST membership, with your:

  • Name
  • Date of birth
  • Passport number

Club to Host Say No To Antisemitism Event

 
As part of the Chelsea Football Club’s ongoing Say No To Antisemitism campaign, the Club is hosting a Holocaust survivor at Stamford Bridge on Tuesday 27th March to meet supporters’ groups. The Club is delighted that Mala Tribich MBE has agreed to share her experiences, followed by a question and answer session.
 
The event will be held in the Champions Club from 6pm to 8pm and the Club would like to invite members of fan groups to the event. Food and a drink will be provided.
 
If you would like to attend, please email enquiries@chelseasupporterstrust.com with all requests for tickets no later than Thursday 22nd March at 5pm. Please include the name of any guests you are bringing as well as any dietary or accessibility requirements. Those who are allocated tickets will be contacted by representatives from the Club.
 
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Pat Nevin Q&A

Full recording of the Pat Nevin Q&A at the Chelsea Supporters’ Trust SGM held in October…

After the recent Chelsea Supporters’ Trust SGM, we were delighted at have former Chelsea player, Pat Nevin as our special guest.

Pat Nevin is one of Chelsea’s most loved former players and graced the Stamford Bridge pitch with his style and flair in the 1980’s. 

Pat is now a respected and insightful football pundit working predominantly with BBC Radio 5 Live and many Chelsea supporters will have read his erudite blogs in ChelseaFC.com.

Pat talked about his career with Chelsea and gave us his thoughts on the current Chelsea side, modern football and working in the media.

The full Q&A can be heard here:

JACK WHITLEY MEMORIAL TO BE UNVEILED

On Saturday 30 September a short service will take place to mark the placing of a memorial stone on the grave of Jack Whitley at Brompton Cemetery. The grave for Whitley, who died in 1955, was previously unmarked and funding for the stone was raised by a crowdfunding campaign organised by the Chelsea Supporters Trust.

Before the unveiling ceremony, there will be a guided tour of Chelsea related graves at 11.00 am held by  Chelsea Historian Rick Glanvill.  If you want to go on the tour meet at the North Entrance to the Cemetery (nearest to West Brompton tube).

The ceremony to unveil the memorial and inscription will be held at at 12.00 pm at the grave. Everyone is welcome to attend both the tour and ceremony.

Jack Whitley’s grave can be found at the north-east corner of Brompton Cemetery and is a 5 minute walk from West Brompton station. The  74 and 430 bus’ stop just outside of the cemetery entrance.

Thanks to the remarkable generosity of Chelsea supporters – and those of other clubs, including Everton and Manchester United –  the target of £5,500 was raised within weeks.

Descendants of Jack were traced and several family members will be present at the service, as well as the match later that day against Manchester City, the special guests of Chelsea FC.

For almost half of his life Jack was a wonderful servant of Chelsea FC. He signed as a goalkeeper from Lincoln in 1907 and kept a clean sheet on his debut against Newcastle United 110 years ago this month – the new club’s first win in the top flight.

After retiring as a player in 1914 he became “Mr Chelsea”: the first team trainer, responsible for all areas of coaching and fitness, with a big role in player liaison and transfer negotiations. He was also trainer of the England team on several occasions – the de facto manager of the national side.

After 32 years at the Bridge, new manager Willie Birrell decided to freshen up the back room staff and Jack was let go in 1939. He eventually moved to Hertfordshire, where he was to die in 1955 – a few months after his beloved Blues won the league championship for the first time. Having committed so much of his life to the Stamford Bridge club it was fitting that he should be buried just across the tracks from the stadium – a fact that only came to light recently as a result of new research by official Chelsea historian Rick Glanvill. 

Jack has earned a unique distinction in Chelsea history. Not only did he serve the club for more than three decades, but he is the only known footballer to be buried at Brompton Cemetery.

The Royal Parks green-space, adjacent to Stamford Bridge, is also the final resting place of former directors, supporters, a chairman, and a manager of the club. All the graves there are tended by the Chelsea Supporters’ Trust’s cemetery clean-up group, run by Cliff Auger, and the Trust has overseen the process of placing a stone on the Whitley grave in conjunction with Glanvill.

Chelsea Supporters Trust Chairman, David Chidgey said: “We are proud to be associated with the campaign to provide a fitting memorial to Jack Whitley, a loyal servant of Chelsea FC. Furthermore we are very grateful for the generosity of Chelsea supporters who donated to the campaign so readily. It proves unquestionably that the bond between supporters and players remains as strong as ever.”

We would like to thank all those who kindly donated money towards the fund, whatever the amount, and express our gratitude to Milestone Memorials, Royal Parks, the Friends of Brompton Cemetery, and Chelsea FC, for helping to make this happen.

Click here for a breakdown of how the £5,500 was spent. 

Good Sense Prevails

Many Chelsea fans, and the wider football community, will have read about the case of an autistic lad, a passionate Chelsea supporter, who was recently caught in possession of two flares on his way to see Chelsea play at West Ham. More of the background to the story can be found here.

David Hislop QC, acting for the young lad, has asked us to pass on his thanks, as the next stage of the process continues….

Good Sense Prevails

The support from Chelsea fans all around the world in answer to a plea for assistance by an autistic Chelsea fan who faced a Football Banning Order was immense. Hundreds of emails, over two thousand tweets. Together with that support, the support of the Chelsea Supporters Trust and the Football Supporters Federation the court today was persuaded to conditionally discharge our young fan for six months and the Police and Crown Prosecution Service were further persuaded to withdraw their application for a Football Banning Order on the basis of a voluntary agreement to counselling from the Football Supporters Federation and an agreement to supervision at future matches. Our fan and family are overwhelmed by the support from the Chelsea supporters community. A special thank you.

The battle now continues to deal with the ban the CFC have imposed pending further investigation and representations. We hope that ‘good sense’ continues to prevail.

David Hislop QC

KTBFFH

A Fitting Memorial to Jack Whitley

Weʼre raising £5,500 to recognise former Chelsea FC player, Jack Whitley, with a memorial on his grave in Brompton Cemetery

Go to our Just Giving page to donate.  Read below to find out more about the background to the project or a short piece endorsing the project on the official Chelsea FC web site.

In summer 2015 a chance rereading of the Albert Sewell book ‘Chelsea Champions!’ led official Chelsea historian Rick Glanvill to discover that Whitley had specifically requested to be buried at Brompton Cemetery and, with the help of the Friends of Brompton Cemetery, Jack’s grave was ‘unearthed’.

Sadly, at the moment it is a common grave with no stone to acknowledge Jack’s presence and his long association with the club just across the railway line.

As he is the only occupant of the grave, we aim to obtain the relevant permissions and place a ledger (or flat slab) with a suitable inscription on, repaying the commitment Jack showed to Stamford Bridge and Chelsea Football Club.

To do this we need to raise around £5,500, and that is where the great Chelsea family comes in.

The aim of this crowdfunding project is to raise enough money to erect a memorial marking the final resting place of one of Chelsea Football Club’s most loyal servants, Jack Whitley. He is the only Chelsea footballer we know to have been buried in the cemetery next door to Stamford Bridge.

Jack served the club loyally and with distinction from the age of 29 to 61, as first-choice goalkeeper (1907-1914), then as first team trainer (1914-1939).

He had died at Tring in Hertfordshire on 5 July 1955, a few months after the club won the league title for the first time in 1955, aged 77.

As well as chipping in what you can afford yourself, please help make every Chelsea supporter you know aware of the crowdfunding exercise. 

Thank you very much,

Chelsea Supporters’ Trust

Go to our Just Giving page here to donate.

 

Jack Whitley – Frequently Asked Questions

Where is Jack’s grave located, and what is there to see at the moment?

Jack’s grave is just off the main path, east of the new Brompton Cemetery visitor centre, close to the north wall. We believe it could become a place of pilgrimage for match-going fans and the perfect place for supporters to begin the tour of the many Chelsea FC-related graves in this beautiful and historic cemetery. The grave is currently marked by nothing except grass, carefully tended by the Chelsea Supporters’ Trust Cemetery Clean-Up Group.

Are you actually entitled to erect a headstone on his grave?

The grave is a common one – not privately owned and paid for. Luckily Jack is the only occupant of this particular plot, so with the correct permissions obtained and an appropriate memorial selected we can go ahead and set a stone on Jack’s grave.

Why did the family not erect a headstone?

Footballers were nothing like as well paid in 1955 as they are now. It is unknown whether Jack’s widow Winifred was unable to afford the expense of a private burial plot and a marker for the burial, or Jack preferred a simple interment in a common grave.

We have attempted to research his family history and find close living relatives, but none has been confirmed to date. We would love to track down next of kin. We know that Jack married twice: firstly to Ellen ‘Nellie’ Edwards in 1897; secondly, in 1942, to Winifred Jessica Farrington. He had at least three children from the first marriage:

Nellie (1902-1983), Ruby (1915-2002) and another child who died young. Nellie married twice (first to tennis star Donald Butcher, then Chelsea footballer Albert Thain) but does not appear to have had children.

Ruby also married twice, to Sidney Upton, then Leslie Keeble, and likewise appears not to have had children. Perhaps someone reading this knew the Whitley family, or their descendants, and can shed more light? If so, we would love to hear from you: rick.glanvill@chelseafc.com.

How would marking Jack’s grave benefit supporters?

Happily, marking Jack’s grave will add a significant, easily accessible new reference point to the self-guided Chelsea FC Brompton Cemetery tour, which already includes many founding directors as well as former manager Bobby Campbell. Chelsea and Royal Parks co-produced a booklet ‘Final Whistle: The Chelsea Football Club Trail at Brompton Cemetery’ (http://www.chelseafc.com/the-club/history/style/brompton-cemetery-trail.html) in 2009, which will need updating.   

Why does Jack deserve a memorial?

Primarily because Jack Whitley is unique – the ONLY Chelsea footballer we know of buried at Brompton Cemetery. He also played a major role throughout the club’s early years.

Firstly, he played 138 times for the Pensioners between his debut on 23 September 1907 and his last match on 4 April 1914, keeping 39 clean sheets, including our first ever in the top flight, on his debut. He was the first goalkeeper to establish himself for longer than one season, and helped Chelsea win promotion to the First Division in 1912.

When his time between the posts came to an end in 1914 he became our first team trainer. Apart from responsibility for the players’ training regime and fitness, he attended to their injuries on match days. Generations of supporters fondly recalled the sight of Jack galloping onto the pitch to attend the fallen with a wet sponge, the tails of his tweed jacket flapping as he ran.

As a well-respected figure throughout the game he also played a part in negotiating some of the great transfers signings of the day, and was part sergeant-major, part father figure to the squad. He served Chelsea for 32 years, from 1907 to May 1939, when incoming manager Billy Birrell let all the coaching staff go.   

It is a rare and wonderful sign of his undimmed affection for the club that when he died in Hertfordshire, just a few months after the Pensioners’ longed-for first league championship win in 1955, he left specific instructions to his wife Winifred that he should be buried next to his beloved Stamford Bridge.

We believe an unmarked grave does not do justice to a man who had Chelsea in his heart for so many decades.

What kind of grave marker are you proposing?

There are regulations and conventions that must be adhered to. We have consulted various monumental masons who work closely with Brompton Cemetery and the most suitable memorial will be a subtle, ledger (flat slab) memorial.

We propose an inscription along the following lines:

 In affectionate memory of

JOHN ‘JACK’ WHITLEY
11 Apr 1908 – 5 Jul 1955

Loyal servant of Chelsea FC for 32 years
Goalkeeper and first team trainer
Who asked to be buried
next to his beloved Stamford Bridge.

Funded by Chelsea FC supporters 2017

How much do you need to raise?

There are three main expenses:

  • Administration fee to place 5’ by 2’ ledger on plot (Royal Parks).
  • 5’ by 2’ ledger, plus inscription and setting (local monumental mason).
  • 50-year lease on plot (Brompton Cemetery).

The total comes to £5,500.

Any donations above this will be given go towards the Cemetery Clean-Up Group, who tend all the Chelsea FC-related graves at Brompton and many elsewhere, and a new edition of the ‘Final Whistle’ cemetery tour booklet. 

Why doesn’t Chelsea FC just pay for it?

We have not asked them to. With support from the club, Chelsea Supporters’ Trust has led the way in keeping the Chelsea FC-related graves free of overgrowth and in good condition.

We feel it would be nice to make this another fan-led project, and that this should be noted in the inscription. We know of no next of kin to Jack, so it falls to us, the great Chelsea family, to do right by him. Of course we welcome donations from anyone.

Go to our Just Giving page here to donate.

Football – 1936 / 1937 seasom – Chelsea Team Group
Back (left to right): George Mills, John O’Hare, Vic Woodley, Jack Whitley (trainer), George Barber, Jimmy Argue.
Front: Dickie Spence, Eric Oakton, Allan Craig (Captain), Mr. Joe Mears (Director/Chairman), Harold Miller, Sam Weaver, Harry Burgess.

 

The Jack Whitley timeline 1878-1955

–  11 Apr 1878 • John Whitley, known as Jack, is born at Seacombe, Cheshire, England

–  Aug 1907 • Signs for Chelsea from Leeds City aged 29, having played for the Pensioners’ secretary-manager David Calderhead at Lincoln City.

–  23 Sep 1907 • As goalkeeper, helps Chelsea to the club’s first ever top flight victory at home to Newcastle – and keeps a clean sheet on his debut.

–  1907-1914 • First-choice goalie and almost ever-present for first three seasons until the arrival of Jim Molyneux in 1910. Makes a total of 138 appearances for the Pensioners: 39 of them without conceding a goal.

–  1912 • Plays 26 of 38 games as the Londoners are promoted back to Division One.

–  1914 • Joins backroom staff as first team trainer aged 36, attending to the injured, assisting in transfer negotiations, and becoming father figure to generations of Stamford Bridge players.

–  1929 • Travels with rest of Chelsea team on the ground-breaking tour of Argentina, Brazil and Ururguay as trainer and emergency goalkeeper.

–  May 1939 • New manager Billy Birrell dispenses with his services as trainer, ending 32-year association with Chelsea FC.

–  5 Jul 1955 • Jack dies at Tring, Hertfordshire, aged 77, but has specifically requested to be interred next to his beloved Stamford Bridge.

–  11 Jul 1955 • Buried at the north end of Brompton Cemetery in a common, unmarked grave.

Chelsea Supporters’ Trust Statement – West Ham United v Chelsea 26th October 2016

Chelsea Supporters’ Trust note with disappointment the events surrounding the West Ham United v Chelsea EFL Cup tie on the evening of Wednesday 26th October 2016.

Clearly we would not wish to condone the behaviour of a minority of fans involved in unsavoury incidents.

Many Chelsea supporters, including young children, were subjected to coins and other missiles being thrown at them during the game and an intimidating and confusing walk back to various public transport hubs after the game.

In addition, procedures for the stewarding and segregation of opposing fans within the stadium appeared to be less than adequate, particularly given the nature and history of this fixture.

Issues of this nature were reasonably foreseeable given the number of well documented problems with stewarding, policing and the segregation of opposing supporters at the ‘London Stadium’ since West Ham took residency and it is clear that in failing to address this, those responsible for crowd management and safety continue to fail in providing a safe environment for football supporters.

We are currently collating an evidence based report from supporters caught up in any pre and post-match and segregation related incidents.  We will be meeting with representatives from Chelsea FC together with the Chelsea Supporters Group, and we will also meet with the Football Supporters Federation and the Metropolitan Police to determine how these issues might be resolved going forward.

In the meantime if you were at the game and wish to share your experiences with us, good or bad, then please email: enquiries@chelseasupporterstrust.com and we will include them in our report.

A PDF copy of the above statement can be downloaded here.

The continued search for Chelsea FC’s heritage

Our firmly established Brompton clean up group reconvened on 8 October 2016 during another international break.  The intrepid gardeners gathered at the Fulham Road gates of Brompton Cemetery and did the rounds of the final resting places of Messrs Janes, Kirby, Maltby and Mears, tidying up around the plots and leaving them clear and accessible for visitors and fans of Chelsea FC interested in learning about our heritage.

But before leaving Brompton Cemetery we headed to an area near to the main entrance where we found the unmarked common grave of former Chelsea player Jack Whitley, Here we worked on marking the plot for further work to be carried out at a future date.
Jack was very loyal to the club, he first played as a goalkeeper in 1907 then worked as a trainer, dedicating over 30 years to Chelsea FC. Jack specifically requested to be buried near his beloved Stamford Bridge when he died in 1955.

Satisfied our work was done at Brompton, three of us headed off to a small village church in Hampshire, invited to tend to the grave of Chelsea ‘godfather’ Frederick Parker, the man who came up with the initial idea to create Chelsea Football Club.

A satisfactory days work, an ongoing project to keep our heritage alive so that fans present and future can learn about our club’s roots.

Our grateful thanks to gardening stalwarts Steve, Adrian and Debs, Cliff for his dedication to the project and Rick Glanvill for the research and the inspiration.

bromptonmilland8-10-16-6-medium

Jack Whitley – in search of a loyal past Chelsea player

As part of our ongoing Brompton Cemetery clear up sessions and club heritage work, Rick Glanvill, Chelsea FC’s historian, has been finding out more about one particular past Chelsea player:

  • 11 April 1878 • Born Seacombe, Cheshire, England
  • Joined Chelsea aged 29 in 1907, having previously played for secretary-manager David Calderhead at Lincoln City.
  • Goalkeeper who kept a clean sheet in our first ever top flight victory. (Home to Newcastle 23 Sep 1907.)
  • Near omni-present for three seasons until the arrival of Jim Molyneux.
  • 138 appearances; 39 of them clean sheets.
  • Joined backroom staff as first team trainer in 1914, aged 36.
  • Travels with rest of team on ground-breaking South America tour as trainer and emergency goalkeeper.
  • Father-figure to generations of players over 25 years. When an injury occurred, his was the familiar figure running onto the pitch to treat them, his suit jacket tails flapping.
  • New manager Billy Birrell finally dispensed with Whitley’s services in May 1939 (along with fellow veteran trainers Jack Harrow and Charlie Harris).
  • Whitley served the club loyally from the age of 29 to 61.
  • In summer 2015 a chance rereading of the Albert Sewell book ‘Chelsea Champions!’ led official club historian Rick Glanvill to discover that Whitley was buried at Brompton Cemetery, a few months after the club won the league title for the first time in 1955.
  • Whitley had died in Hertfordshire aged 77, but had specifically requested to be interred next to his beloved Stamford Bridge. He was buried at the north end of Brompton Cemetery in an unmarked grave on 11 July 1955.

jack-whitley

We would love to track down next of kin. We know that Jack married twice: firstly to Ellen ‘Nellie’ Edwards in 1897; secondly, in 1942, to Winifred Jessica Farrington. He had at least three children from the first marriage: Nellie (1902-1983), Ruby (1915-2002) and another child who died young. Nellie married twice (first to tennis star Donald Butcher, then Chelsea footballer Albert Thain) but does not appear to have had children. Ruby also married twice, to Sidney Upton, then Leslie Keeble, and likewise appears not to have given birth.

Perhaps someone out there knew the Whitley family, or descendants, and has information to the contrary? We would love to hear it. Please contact us at enquiries@chelseasupporterstrust.com if you can add to the story.

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whitley-caricature-mar-1908

whitley